Dolcefino Consulting

WHEN: 10:00 am, Saturday October 21, 2017
WHERE: Footbridge near the Northwest Corner of Jones AT&T Stadium between lot C-1 and the Stadium

It’s time for Coach Mike Leach to get paid.

In 2009, Texas Tech University fired the most winning football coach in University history, after allegations he mistreated a player. Leach was never charged, and the University never paid him the more than $2 million dollars he was contracted to be paid.

Tomorrow, Wayne Dolcefino, president of Dolcefino Consulting, will speak at a press event outside the stadium. Coach Leach wants all of his supporters to show up and sign the petition to compel the University to make good on his contract.

paycoachleach.com/

Texas Tech doesn’t deny the members of the Board of Regents talk about government business on their phones. We all know they do. The University just doesn’t want you to see who they talked to.

What’s the big secret?

Dolcefino Consulting filed a formal request under the Texas Public Information Act for the phone records of the Regents, along with former Chancellor Kent Hance. The request only seeks records of phone calls and text messages relating to the business of Texas Tech.

Texas Tech University’s fiscal year 2017 operating budget was over $926 million dollars, an increase of $27 million dollars over the previous year.

The Texas Attorney General has previously ruled the detailed cell phone records of public employees and government officials are public, and defines the University as a major state agency. However, the school is arguing the Regents are just appointed, only meet five times a year, and have no individual power.

“My favorite argument from the esteemed University lawyer is all these smart Regents won’t be able to tell which phone calls were business and which ones were personal,” says Wayne Dolcefino, President of Dolcefino Consulting. “I say take a stab. You can do it. This is an important fight for the public’s right to know. Most University business is being done by phone and e-mail and Texas Tech knows it. They just want to hide it.”

The phone records were requested as part of a widening investigation by the Houston based Investigative Communications Firm run by former Investigative Reporter Wayne Dolcefino.

Dolcefino Consulting is also probing the refusal of the University to pay former football coach Mike Leach, who led the Red Raiders to the best winning season in history. The University still owes Leach $2.5 million dollars.

Leach, now a football coach for Washington State has waged his own campaign to get the money he is owed. On Twitter, #PAYCOACHLEACH has a growing number of supporters.

“Maybe Texas Tech needs help finding waste in the University so they have the money to pay Leach,” says Dolcefino. “We are going to help them find it.”

paycoachleach.com

TEXAS TECH CORR TO AG 10-12-17

The battle to release records kept secret by the City of Houston begins in court tomorrow.

EcoHub and its founder George Gitschel will ask State District Judge Kristen Hawkins to order the City of Houston to produce e-mails sent or received by Houston garbage boss Harry Hayes.

Stewart Hoffer, Attorney for EcoHub, wants to view the e-mails under a protective order as allowed under the Texas Public Information Act. Hoffer will not be allowed to share the contents of the e-mails with the public, or even his clients.

Joining the legal battle as a plaintiff is Wayne Dolcefino, President of the Investigative Communications firm Dolcefino Consulting.  His company requested the records on behalf of EcoHub.

“The City of Houston has fought for nearly a year to keep e-mails about garbage and recycling contracts secret,” says Dolcefino.  “If these garbage deals were good for the City of Houston, what is the Mayor afraid we will see?”

Turner’s decision not to continue the nearly complete deal with EcoHub prompted allegations of bid rigging and favoritism for the company eventually chosen.

“It is time for the City of Houston to honor the public right to know,” says Hoffer.  “If the City of Houston has nothing to hide, then they shouldn’t be wasting taxpayer money fighting to keep e-mails secret.  Fiscal responsibility will be paramount in the weeks ahead. The law allows our firm to inspect every e-mail that is responsive to EcoHub’s numerous prior requests, and we hope that Judge Hawkins will see things our way.”

The court hearing will be held tomorrow, Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 at 2:00 pm in the courtroom of the 55th District Court, on the ninth floor of the Civil Court house at 201 Caroline Street, Houston, Texas.

The innovative recycling firm Ecohub will ask State District Judge Kristen Hawkins next week to order the City of Houston to produce e-mails sent or received by Houston garbage boss Harry Hayes.

Hicks Thomas’ attorney, Stewart Hoffer wants to view the e-mails under a protective order as allowed under the Texas Public Information Act. State law allows this type of inspection. Hoffer will not be allowed to share the contents of the e-mails with the public, or even his clients.

“It is time for the City of Houston to honor the public right to know”, says Hoffer.” If the City of Houston has nothing to hide, then they shouldn’t be wasting taxpayer money-fighting to keep e-mails secret, especially after Hurricane Harvey, where fiscal responsibility will be paramount in the weeks ahead. In the meantime, the law allows our firm to inspect every e-mail that is responsive to Echohub’s numerous prior requests, and we hope that Judge Hawkins will see things our way.”

The City of Houston has fought for more than 10 months to keep e-mails about garbage and recycling contracts secret. Ecohub was chosen to turn Houston garbage into new products, but Mayor Turner never told the company he was going to start over and choose an entirely different company. The move prompted allegations of bid rigging and favoritism for the company eventually chosen.

The records were requested by Dolcefino Consulting, the Houston based Investigative Communications Firm run by Investigative Reporter Wayne Dolcefino.

“The Mayor has the power to release all these records today. In fact, there is evidence the City of Houston has provided false information to the Texas Attorney General about these records,” says Dolcefino. “The Mayor’s lack of transparency on the use of tens of millions of dollars of taxpayer money is unacceptable.”

The court hearing will be held Tuesday, October 10, 2017 at 2:00pm in the courtroom of the 55th District Court, on the ninth floor of the Civil Court house at 201 Caroline Street, Houston, TX.

The Mayor’s plan for a 9% tax hike to pay for debris cleanup will hurt storm victims’ hard.
That’s why ECOHUB founder George Gitschel has a deal for the Mayor, a way to recycle storm debris instead of just keeping it in a landfill for life.

“I am a Houstonian, and my friends and neighbors were hurt too. This is a heartache, but there may be a way to turn a tragedy into a positive. I hope the Mayor will work with us to avoid a tax increase,” says George Gitschel, founder of ECOHUB.

Gitschel looks at these piles of storm debris as a scientist, and sees money in the debris, not just destroyed memories.

“Everything in the debris, from family photos, soggy carpet to sheetrock can be recycled, a lot of it into fuel,” says Gitschel. “We are willing to sit down with the City today to come up with a plan to expedite private financing of a plant so that we can recycle debris from this and future storms, and then share the profits with taxpayers”.

ECOHUB has offered to save the City up to 40 million dollars a year in exchange for city garbage, and wants a bunch of that money to help fix fire equipment and give firefighters a deserved pay raise. 

In the wake of the hurricane, Facebook Viewers on Dolcefino Consulting wanted to know if ECOHUB has a way to avoid a tax increase. Gitschel says yes.

“The tax increase the Mayor proposes doesn’t raise any money until sometime next year, and we are willing to start building our plant immediately. Houstonians know this flood will not be our last, so let’s begin a way to revolutionize the way we treat storm debris at the same time. That is the way Houston should think.”

Gitschel is available for interviews on the subject. Media should contact Dolcefino Consulting.

On the eve of a huge vote by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, there is potentially dangerous new information about the proposed Green Group Dump in Caldwell County.

Dolcefino Consulting has learned Green Group never secured the water they need to control dust and fight fire that plague landfills.

Worse, the company may have misled the State Office of Administration Hearings on their capacity to fully protect health and safety.

Green Group has paraded around a letter from the privately owned, Polonia Water Supply, saying they would accept the dump as a customer if they met their rules.  Green Group says it needs up to 300,000 gallons of water a month, in part to help control dust. 

Unfortunately, the company never formally applied to be a customer. Polonia Water President tells Dolcefino Consulting they might not approve letting their water be used for dust control.

Worse, their water can’t be used to fight fires.  There are 8,300 landfill fires a year, and some have burned for years.

“It will be shocking for the TCEQ to approve a landfill without assurance there will be a water supply to fight fires and control dust” says Wayne Dolcefino, President of Dolcefino Consulting.

“This is a company with a history, and Texas should say, No Thank You.”

Dolcefino Consulting will be on hand Wednesday morning, September 6 when the TCEQ meets, you can watch the permit hearing live at:http://www.texasadmin.com/tx/tceq/agenda_meeting/20170906/ or at Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/DolcefinoCommunicationsLlc/

You can catch up on the troubled history of Green Group athttp://www.exposegreengroup.com/

The Colorado Division of Securities isn’t shy about promoting their alleged success stories cracking down on white collar fraud. Officials in the Department of Regulatory Agency routinely take turns congratulating each other in news releases.

One big problem.   They are grossly exaggerating their financial success for Colorado taxpayers.

Take Securities Commissioner Jerry Rome.

Since he became head of the agency in 2014, he has spent three times more money prosecuting cases than they have really collected for Coloradans.

In October of 2015, the Securities Commissioner was thanked for the $10-million-dollar judgement against John Koral of a company called U.S. Capitol.   The company had filed bankruptcy five years before.  Records provided by the Securities Division shows as of this Spring, investors and taxpayers have never gotten a penny from the court decision. It is not clear what efforts, if any, the Securities Division took to actually get the money back.

“Commissioner Rome should put out the real story.  Are these long investigations paying off for Colorado taxpayers and the investors who really lose money,” says Wayne Dolcefino, President of the investigative communications firm in Houston, Texas. “What’s the point of promoting all this money you won, if you never plan to collect it?”

Dolcefino is a former investigative reporter with 30 Emmys, and multiple other investigative awards to his credits. His firm exposes government waste and corruption.

Since 2011, official records of the Colorado Securities Division actually show a truly dismal collection rate from fraud cases.

A spreadsheet provided by the Division of Securities shows the agency won judgements and court orders totaling more than $122 million dollars for investors and Colorado taxpayers. There are dozens of news releases promoting the cases and the victories.

You know how much they have collected in the agency?

A little more than 3 million dollars.

“The legislature should take a hard look at the priorities of the division, and whether getting judgements against people that are long gone and not paying accomplishes anything. It will be interesting to see how many cases they have lost, or if this a game of bragging about money no one will ever see,” says Dolcefino.

This coming year the budget of the Division of Securities is more than 3.5 million dollars.

Wayne Dolcefino to lead HCC misconduct investigation, school trustee announces (KPRC 2)

Houston Community College Trustee Dave Wilson on Thursday announced an investigation into misconduct.

Wilson said that Wayne Dolcefino will lead the investigation into the school after Chris Oliver’s recent bribery conviction.

Wilson expressed his disappointment in Oliver’s actions and felt the school needed an independent investigation for the benefit of the students.

Oliver, 53, was originally charged March 9 and pleaded guilty May 15.

HCC trustee hires consultant, lawyer to look into money troubles (Houston Chronicle)

Houston Community College trustee Dave Wilson, expressing doubt with the impartiality of the college system’s internal investigation into procurement practices, hired consultant Wayne Dolcefino and attorney Keith Gross to investigate procurement, facilities, employment and related financial matters.

Houston recycling

New e-mails obtained by Dolcefino Consulting prove Mayor Sylvester Turner tried to keep the company EcoHub from being able to compete for a new Houston recycling contract. That move may now be keeping Houstonians from saving tens of millions of dollars.

The company filed a protest when Turner issued a new bid for recycling last year, but the Mayor has insisted they were welcome to compete for the lucrative contract instead. Now we know Turner fought to write the bid to intentionally keep them out.

The City of Houston is fighting release of e-mails written in 2016 on recycling, but a handful of documents released late last week expose the real truth.

In April 2016, City of Houston Procurement Officers were trying to make sure the new recycling bid included language that would allow One Bin type companies to complete. The City of Houston was in the final negotiations with ECOHUB when Turner took office, but instead of finishing the recommended deal that could save taxpayers millions, Turner sought a new bidding.

Amidst attempts to add the language, Solid Waste Director Harry Hayes told bid writers that he had elevated the issue to the Mayor and that Turner had declared “One Bin” dead.

“These e-mails are smoking guns, so imagine what are in the documents the City of Houston is fighting so hard to keep secret,” says Wayne Dolcefino, President of Dolcefino Consulting. “The Mayor owes taxpayers the full truth. We shouldn’t have to go to court to get him to be honest about this deal, especially when we have a City in deep financial trouble.”

The scandal over ECOHUB has become especially important because the company has offered to share profits with Houston taxpayers, and promised savings of up to 40 million dollars a year.

“That is enough money to give Houston firefighters the huge raise they deserve,” says Dolcefino. “Houston City Council decides contracts. They should order a bid rigging investigation and if wrongdoing is found, they should move forward to finish the contract negotiations with ECOHUB.”

The documents are available below. Wayne is available for comments to the media concerning this Houston recycling story.

Hanahan Emails re Ecohub
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